Monday, February 9, 2015

Strawberry Season

It is strawberry season in Florida.  There was a tasting competition at the Saturday morning farmers' market in downtown.  The strawberries sold out.
I had to go to the supermarket.


Not organic, but still quite beautiful.  Strawberries here will last for weeks and weeks.

Strawberry season in Vermont lasts for about ten days in June if the conditions are ideal, but they are all the sweeter for the rarity.

21 comments:

  1. Strawberries are anti-oxidant, too, aren't they?
    Those look beautiful.

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  2. I just bought some today, from Mexico by way of California. We have them year round in the markets, of course. But REAL strawberries, grown in Oregon and Washington, never make it to the supermarkets. Their season is in June, for about three to four weeks, and to get them you must go to farm stands, up pick, or go to farmer's markets.

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    1. Yes. I like a grandchildren outing to the berry patch in June.

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  3. I love fresh strawberries. I am also big on blackberries. I'm seriously thinking about starting a berry corner in my yard. Wouldn't it be wonderful to walk out your backdoor and grab a handful of berries. I'm definitely going to head to the store. All this talk about strawberries and I can't wait.

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  4. I love fresh strawberries. I am also big on blackberries. I'm seriously thinking about starting a berry corner in my yard. Wouldn't it be wonderful to walk out your backdoor and grab a handful of berries. I'm definitely going to head to the store. All this talk about strawberries and I can't wait.

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    1. I am sure the deer and rabbits that eat everything else would be grateful for strawberries for dessert, but I have decided I will just support the farmers' markets from now on.

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  5. I do love strawberries. One of my greatest accomplishments was planting and harvesting a strawberry crop. I felt great joy and always laugh about my young grandson holding up a large strawberry out of the patch and announcing, "Wow, these are just like the real ones you get in the grocery store!"

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  6. You can't beat those Plant City strawberries. We use to get them by the flat.
    The strawberries I grow are smaller but just as sweet. The birds beat me to most of them.

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    1. I have a friend who stays near Plant City and she practically turns into a strawberry this time of year.

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  7. Blogger got me again. Since when does hitting the Publish button mean sending your comment to circle the rings of Saturn? Try it again and make sure I copy the message before I click publish.

    The best strawberries I ever ate grew wild near the railroad down in the woods when I was a kid. They were only the size of the end of your little finger and a bit more tart than the store bought versions. What they did not have was a lot of tasteless white pulp that puffs up the size of the berry but does nothing for the flavor. My observation was that they had the flavor or one strawberry packed into a small berry. They made the best strawberry short cake that I ever ate.

    Unfortunately, while not near the tracks, they did grow on railroad property. The bulls took a very dim view of us trespassing, so we had to keep a firm eye on the access road. A plain sedan would come roaring down the road and we would have to run like hell trying not to lose this precious railroad property from our pans in the process. It was great fun, somewhat illegal, and very tasty...what more could a kid ask for?

    Alas it did ruin me for store-bought strawberries. The inverse of having one strawberry's worth of flavor packed into a berry the size of the end of your finger, is to dilute it in the size of ping pong ball loaded with tasteless white pulp. They can hybridize them to the size of water mellons, but there is still only going to be one berry's worth of flavor per berry.

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    1. i have found small patches of the wild berries, but never in a quantity for anything more than popping them immediately into the mouth--unwashed and all.

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  8. Olga, I'm so glad to see how well you are doing and that you are still able to live in two places your love.

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  9. I usually think of local strawberries in May, but we still buy them all year long. Maybe the ones we buy are from Florida!

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  10. I'm not holding my breath waiting for strawberry season here in CO, but I've been buying tasty organic (shipped) ones at market.

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  11. DH and I love strawberries also. I had my first chocolate dipped strawberry on the Alaskan cruise... pretty good stuff! At our house we mainly eat them in fresh spinach salad with honeyed pecans and a vinaigrette dressing.

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    1. I think that salad sounds absolutely perfect!

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  12. Oh to have fresh strawberries in February! The ones in the store tend to taste rather woody at this time of year and we won't see local ones until July.

    Enjoy!

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  13. I do love strawberries. We used to go to the strawberry farm in Wisconsin to pick them. Sigh. This brings back such lovely memories.

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  14. One of the things I do miss about Michigan and living on the farm -- we had a huge strawberry patch and I'm sure I eat as many as I picked! The strawberries in the market in southern California have no flavor. They are pretty but tasteless. Some of the farmers markets have good ones but not yet.

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  15. Goodness, strawberries! We are so frozen!!!!

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