Thursday, November 3, 2011

A Burning Issue


Look out.  Breasts and bras are floating around the blogosphere these days.

As predicted, Mike was quite taken with the notion of the  purported therapeutic effects of gazing at breasts.  He did argue that all studies have flaws when I pointed out the idea was looking...nothing said about touching.  He also does prefer that I refer to him as "science guy" rather than "dirty old man."

Ronnie Bennett at Time Goes By wrote about bras for us mature women.  I tried several times to comment, but for some reason could not make the right connection.  So, I'll make my comments here for what they might be worth.

For many years I wore a 36B bra.  It was uncomfortable.  I actually would wiggle out of it on my drive home from work. And people think that texting and driving is a distracting practice.

I would sometimes have a "fitting" and the verdict was always, "36B."  One time I was "fitted" while wearing a baggy sweater--"38B" she said.  At that time I was noticing sagging, hence the desire for a professional assessment.  Oprah was urging women to get fitted, for Pate's sake.  I tried on the 38Bs, but the tatas sagged right out from under them.  I left that store without making a purchase.

Fortunately, it was about that time that I attended a clinic sponsored by a local fabric store.  It was about fitting styles and patterns for your particular body type.  The woman teaching this seminar looked at me and said. "We can knock ten years off you with a new bra."  And she was right.  I don't take my bra off until bedtime now.  It's comfortable and it keeps things where they were meant to be.

Finding this little miracle was a two step process.

The first step was 3 measurements:
  1. Measurement A--around the body above the breasts and just below the arm pits.
  2. Measurement B--around the fullest part of the breasts.
  3. Measurement C--around the body just below the breasts.
Average measurements A and C.  (Add them together and then divide by 2.)  That gives the band number. Mine was 34.
Find the difference between B and C (subtract).  For each inch, go up a cup size.  My difference was five inches which translates to a DD cup.  Who would ever guess?

The second step involves trying on.  I tried lots of brands of 34DD and let me tell you there are many variations in fit.  I so wanted to buy Olga brand, but that didn't work out.  I stick with Lilyette, style 0921.

It took decades, but I am happy in my bra now.  That's as feel good as a good haircut.

Anatomy of a bra

11 comments:

  1. When the 'girls' are happy, everybody is happy!!!

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  2. You are just bragging! I just found my ta-tas but to gain 30 pounds!

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  3. Great post! I had to really laugh at your comment about texting while driving is nothing compared to trying to wiggle out of a bra while driving.

    I actually had a bust reduction and still have hard time finding a bra to fit. It takes me forever to find just the right fit. I'm not telling my size. It is smaller than it once was, but still not one I would publish. :)

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  4. and don't forget to tighten those bra straps from time to time!

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  5. You and Pamela Anderson could exchange bras.

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  6. I had a similiar experience! For years I thought I was a 36B. I finally discovered I was a 34D. I remember thinking: OMG! If I had known this in college I would have lived an entirely different life!

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  7. Margaret, yeah...except in college I was more like 32AA. Maybe I should take a class now!

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  8. It's true, well-fitting is important.

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  9. Glad that you got to a size and brand that works. Great job on the sizing notes!

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  10. "The Bra Lady" gave me help last year because the underwires of my old bras poked me.

    Nothing like a good fitting and the right bra.

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  11. I always wanted to make a second career of bra fitting but my wife says that I could not remain objective.

    I ran into a guy that once worked for a large chemical company. His job was to study women for proper panty hose sizing, comfort, and style. One thing I found amazing was that there were regional differences within the US. A pair of panty hose sold in the north east is different from the deep south...etc.

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