Monday, February 23, 2015

Changes

There are signs that the real estate bust of a few years ago here in Florida is starting a turn around.

Apparently, there is nothing like cold, snowy, nasty winters in the north to boost the Florida economy.

Four years ago this shopping strip mall was built seemingly in the middle of nowhere.  Apart from the fact that it is close to an I-75 exit, Mike and I could not understand why it was being built.  It did stay empty for a couple of years, then started filling up a little.

And then a great deal more of the thick tree and shrub cover started being bulldozed and burned off.

 Condominiums are going up.

Whole home developments are in the works.  Each one the equivalent of a small Vermont town in terms of the number of homes.


And not far away:

Three years ago, Mike's last winter in Florida, this space was entirely wooded.  Cattle and horse farms were nearby. When I came last winter this strip  mall had popped up.

When I got here this winter, a MacDonald's had been added.  What surer sign of a construction boom?  And, yes, land is being cleared for new developments all around this area as well.

Quiet little Venice is changing.



16 comments:

  1. Sometimes, development is good, sometimes it is bad. I hope your mayor knows how to plan wisely. Otherwise, people won't vote for him again if they are unhappy with the way the town looks.

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    1. I do hope at least some of the rural spaces will be spared.

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  2. Yeah, a lot of people seem to be headed for Florida, if not permanently at least for the season. I was there in Jan. and the place seemed very crowded -- and that's before the season even really gets started. I wonder: Do you think it will sink into the ocean?

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  3. I'm sorry to hear that farms are going away and land is being cleared for yet more boxes. But I do have to say . . . this time of year the pull of the Green is strong. I think I'd get awfully tired of the Flat soon enough, though, if I lived there.
    Do you miss hills?

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    1. I do not miss the hills, especially when I am out for a bike ride. But when I am in Vermont, I don't miss the flat either. Because I don't even bother to have a bike in Vermont.

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  4. I suppose the economy is righting itself -- and that's good. But losing your peace and quiet isn't so nice. Many of our friends and family do the winter in Florida, too.

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  5. I bet Mike wouldn't believe how it looks now. I can imagine you miss talking all of this over with him. However, I bet he would be glad you are still coming down.

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    1. i still talk these things over with Mike. What? people don;t think I am talking to myself, do they?

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  6. Build it and they will come.
    I saw this entirely too often when I lived there. Small, delightful towns just started bulging at the seams. One reason I moved to Arkansas.

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  7. Having lived in southern California for so many years I have seen the same thing happen here -- especially in the small little beach towns. Orange groves have been turned into housing developments and condo complexes that all look alike. There is one area where all the homes are painted one of four colors -- and the four colors are all different shades of beige.

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  8. I hate to see development, myself. Yes I suppose it is needed for all the reasons. But things are always more congested and we need patches of green.

    We are fortunate in SW Pennsylvania to have a lot of ravines that are not conducive to development. It keeps a patch a woods in what would otherwise be an endless asphalt wasteland.

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  9. It's always sad to see bulldozing and building. I guess it is also good to know that the economy is rebounding. We heard that the real estate market is coming back in Florida. Housing was much less than it is here. With all the building, I'm sure the prices will be driven up.

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  10. It seems that development is constant, everyone wants a bigger, better property, larger yards, etc. I have to wonder when it will end...perhaps when there are no farms to provide food and everything is produced out of some factory? Scary!

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  11. Too much development spells the end to quiet and secluded! Hope your little community remains fairly serene. I live at he end of a dead end road but 2 miles away, in the center of town, there are hoards of tourists.

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  12. Yup! Same thing in Hawaii. Over here it's gradual so I'm not noticing it as much... well... sort of. However, in California I was shocked at how much construction has gone on. My sister-in-law's house used to be wilderness on one side. Now it's FILLED with malls, housing and what not.

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  13. We live in a neighborhood that was originally small farms. After WWII it was developed with small single family homes. We're close to the airport so property values aren't as high. We built our home 40 years ago on what was once a chicken farm before it was subdivided. Now big lots are being subdivided and large homes are being added alongside the existing original small, old homes. It is a very mixed neighborhood, in very slow transition.
    But down in the valley, which used to be rich agricultural land, malls and warehouse have paved over the farm land, ringed by huge apartment and condo complexes. Growth happens. It's not always pretty.

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