Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Sobering Age

In a few days I will be an official recipient of Medicare, Parts A and B.  My supplemental insurance, including prescription drug coverage is in place.

The whole process was easier for me than it was for Mike five years ago.  My old health insurance had a supplemental plan and it was easy to make the switch.  Mike basically had to start from scratch.

Right now I am relatively healthy.  Mike is feeling much better than he has for quite a while.  Given what far too many of our friends and family members have gone through in the past few years, we have to be very grateful for our own health and well being.

It is sobering when people our age and younger undergo serious health crises.   It's not that my life was never touched by death.  My grand parents died when I was in high school.  They were old--in their seventies.  About all my parents' generation relations have gone, but they were really old--in their 80's and 90's.  And people my age have died over the years.  By my tenth high school reunion, ten of my class mates had already died.  But that was the 60's--drugs, risky behavior, and freak accidents happened.

People my age dying of "old age" diseases?  It just is scary.

As some of you know, we went to visit Mike's brother over the past weekend.  He had surgery last week.  He went through that fairly well but then there were complications.  He did not know we visited, but the word is that there has been slight improvement since.  He is going in the right direction, but we still don't know exactly what they found during the surgery.  In some cases, it comes down to a matter of will.

So, in our own ways, we pray.

23 comments:

  1. I will be joining the medicare club in less than a year and wonder what the process will be like. From my experience with my mother and mother in law, it does not appear that they made it very easy.

    I went through a bit of mortality planning when I retired. It is a rather bizarre process, you and your spouse running a race against your assets. Which will run out first? I found my internal accountant cheering over my early demise...HEY wait a second! Any how for the purpose of rough estimates I have always used 80 as a check out date. No firm plans mind you, just an estimate. In my youth it seemed a nice way to look at the great expanse of life that awaited me. At 20 you have 20/80 * 100 ...25% of your life consumed...hey hey I still have 75%. But when you reach 60 and you reverse those percentages it starts to get a bit hairy. 64/80 * 100 = 80% damn only 20% left. Good God, how did I lose 5% in only four years? I am not ready for only 20%. Well no problem, it is just actuarial statistics. Move that end date up to 99 and by hoochie you get a nice comfy 35% remaining.

    Gallows humor only gets you so far, you are right it is very frightening.

    I hope your brother in law fully recovers.

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    1. My math is limited to believing that 100% of the rest of my life is still ahead of me. I must be an optimist.

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    2. An excellent way of looking at it and much simpler math!

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  2. I was fortunate in that with SSDI, I was able to get Medicare much earlier. Of course, I still need a separate health insurance to cover the gaps. It is scary when I think about getting old -- OLD OLD. I see the process so clearly when I visit my mother in the nursing home. Good thoughts for your brother-in-law.
    Peace,
    Muff

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    1. Thanks. I watched my other's decline through dementia as well. It is a scary proposition.

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  3. I hate that we are getting older but like you I am just happy that we are as healthy as we are -- which is certainly healthier than many of my friends. My goal is to out live my Grandmother who I certainly take after. She lived to be 95. I am hoping to get to at least 96 and to be as alive and active as she was until then. Keeping good thoughts for your BIL.

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    1. My mom lived to 93, but she had dementia. I love to hear about those who are mentally sharp and physically active to a ripe old age. You are lucky to have good genes.

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  4. David and I will probably have to start from scratch, too. For now, I have Medicare Part A and am covered by David's health insurance from his job. Prayers for your BIL.

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  5. The first few years after I retired I felt great and didn't feel my age. Can't say that anymore. Nothing serious, just general wear and tear on the old body.

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    1. I do get that vigorous good health is a temporary status, but I try to do the right things to maintain it anyway.

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  6. Going through that supplementary process right now, so I'm all set up by August, when I turn that magical age. All I can say is so far so good.

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    1. It is kind of a wake up call, isn't it!

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  7. I am living dangerously and only have Medicare, no supplement. So far, even with a couple of out patient surgeries, it has not left me in the lurch and has paid quite well. I guess if I get any long term illnesses, I will regret it. Toes crossed.
    Just put your BIL in my prayers.

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    1. Thanks, Patti. I think for my BIL, it has come down to a matter of will--and he is giving both sides serious consideration.

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  8. DH and I both have medicare, a supplement, a Rx plan, and a dental plan even though we are both relatively healthy. But we are big believers in insurance and IMO, it does help. If you do have to go in for *tests*, they can be unbelievably expensive.

    Also praying for your BIL...

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    1. We do not have dental insurance. That is my way of living on the edge! Thank-you for the prayers.

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  9. Not on medicare yet? What a youngster!
    Our health coverage transferred very easily into our Medicare and supplemental too. It's wonderful. And we feel very fortunate to have it. We do our best to stay healthy, but you never know.

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    1. So true about never knowing. Mike's heart/health problems popped up so fast two summers ago it made my head spin. Like I said, I know health can be fragile but I want to do what I can to safeguard it if I can.

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  10. You are young! I've been on Medicare for three years now and was grateful to get there because that meant I could stop making COBRA payments. Our supplemental is excellent. This is a good thing since I've had so many health issues in the past few years. Five ER visits in six weeks in April and Man. Then, I spent three nights and two days in the hospital this month. Thankfully, everything has been covered.

    Being just two years from 70, I think I am still young. My mother will be 97 tomorrow and has no health problems at all. She is in better health than I am. I'm working on getting healthier. I've just been hit by freaky things in the last few years. One just never knows.

    I hope your brother-in-law will begin to improve.

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    1. Well, at least it sounds as though you have some good genes working for you. Do take care.

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  11. I too am beginning the process of signing up for Medicare ... and plan to blog about it. But any way you look at it, as they say (and as you point out), old age is not for the faint of heart.

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  12. Well, that is a bit heavier than usual. Sounds like you are weighing sme heavy issues. Best wishes to your brother in law.

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I appreciate readers' comments so much. You don't even always have to agree with me.